Frat House From the Film ‘Neighbors’ Lands on Market in L.A. for $1.5M

Neighbors movie house

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Think of a typical frat house. Your mind conjures up images of peeling paint, Greek letters above the front door, loud music, parties, and people coming and going at all hours.

Now take a look at this gorgeous Los Angeles Craftsman home—no trace of a toga party or red Solo Cup in sight. However, it served as a cinematic fraternity house rife with debauchery in the 2014 comedy “Neighbors” and its 2016 sequel, “Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising.”

The popular films starred Seth Rogen and Rose Byrne, who, as new parents with a baby, are shocked to learn that a fraternity has just moved in next door. Hilarity ensues, but the real home is no laughing matter.

Built in 1907 and tucked into the West Adams neighborhood, this Craftsman is large enough to host a party, just not of the fratty variety. It has 3,873 square feet with five bedrooms and 2.5 baths.

The listing agent, Andrea Dunlop of Sotheby’s International Realty, priced the property at $1,495,000—a judicious choice, as it happens. Ten offers came in within the home’s first two weeks on the market.

“We’re in escrow now, significantly over asking price,” Dunlop says.

The current owners bought the place in 2012 for $690,000. They agreed not to live in the home during filming, and made a pretty penny doing so.

“They actually had to move out for a few months,” says Dunlop. “With the money they made from the production, they used it to restore the house. They added landscaping, stripped all the trim, replaced the roof and central heat.”

While it is not currently included, central air conditioning could easily be installed, Dunlop added.

“The previous owner put in the pool,” she says. Fans of the films will no doubt recall the (ahem!) raucous poolside parties.

Entryway

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Stairwell

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First floor

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Dining room

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Kitchen

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Kitchen seating

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One of the bedrooms

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One of the bathrooms

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“It’s got a lot of light, which is unusual for a Craftsman,” says Dunlop.

Attached to the modernized kitchen is an outdoor dining deck.

Wide doorways inside are matched with a wide front porch that offers space for plenty of furnishings and can be used as an outdoor “living room.” Original built-ins throughout the home have been lovingly restored.

On the second floor are four of the five bedrooms, and the remaining bedroom is on the third floor, which has a half-bathroom.

The top-floor bedroom could be repurposed as a lounge or home office, or used as a playroom for the kids.

Given the age of the home, it doesn’t have a single living room. Instead, it has two sitting rooms that once served as formal parlors.

A wine/beer cellar in the basement looks like a fun spot to entertain guests.

The saltwater pool is also a huge selling feature—particularly because it’s long enough to swim laps and features an attached hot tub.

The fact that the home spans three stories is a rare amenity for West Adams, says Dunlop. Other perks outdoors include raised vegetable beds, a pergola, garage, and, yes, a taproom. Party!

What is living in this pocket of L.A. like? For one, it’s totally walkable. Most of the homes are historic and well-maintained.

“Almost all of the houses are between early 1900s and 1920s,” says Dunlop.

“It’s midblock on one of the most gorgeous blocks in the area, smack-dab in the center of Los Angeles and close to the 10 freeway. You can get anywhere in L.A. within 10 or 15 minutes.”

She describes the West Adams area as “just emerging.”

“We’re getting very hip restaurants,” she says. Because the location is close to the University of Southern California, “We’ve always had food options, but it seems like there are more now. Art galleries are also popping up, and coffee shops, too.”

Typically, homeowners in the area tend to remain in their homes for decades.

“It’s unusual to have a house that goes on the market, period,” says Dunlop.

Although this property is move-in ready, the next owners may rest assured that financial incentives (in the form of reduced property taxes) will be available in future for the purposes of historical preservation.

The Mills Act, linked to the California Office of Historic Preservation, has already been secured for the property.

And as for the real neighbors, they needn’t worry about the buyers’ being inspired by the films.

“I don’t think the people who saw the house had even seen the movie,” says Dunlop. She says she believes it was “the pool and the Mills Act” that caught buyers’ attention.

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